Excellent Examples of the Science of Negotiation

This video has some fantastic examples of deception detection techniques including verbal slips, manipulators, and emblematic slips.  I love reality TV, for continually pumping out more and more shows with pristine examples of people negotiating under real circumstance.  I’ve witnessed this exact same scenario along with all of the “slips” occur off camera countless times.

Here’s a summary of the highlights:

  1. Manipulation – at 0:25 seconds into the video the seller gentle rocks back and forth before delivering his opening offer.  This subtle shift is caused by his own discomfort with his opening offer.  In his mind he is willing to accept a lower figure.  If you’re able to pick up this information, you know his offer is “soft” or “movable”.
  2. Emblematic Slip – The buyer rubbing his hands together like he’s about to “dig in to dinner” indicates his pleasure with the opening offer.  That certainly isn’t a normal response for rejecting a proposal.
  3. Verbal Slips – at 1:16 seconds into the negotiation, the buyer’s opening offer gives us some extremely common verbal slips.  “I think…..” and “More like around…”.  “I think…” indicates an aspiration not a constraint.  Literally, the buyer hopes $4500 is where the deal closes.  A constraint would be the actual budget or break point.  “More like around….” indicates a range.  A price range by definition infers there is room to move your offer.
  4. Emblematic Slip – at 1:24 seconds the seller responds to the buyer’s offer of $4500, however their initial response doesn’t appear to say “No”.  Instead the slip indicates he’s considering their offer or at least the offer is within his range of acceptability.
  5. Verbal Slip – at 2:01 second the seller counters with “I think… I’d have to do $5k”.  You get the idea.

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